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Fourth Quarter 7

Page history last edited by PBworks 12 years, 10 months ago

Fourth Quarter 7



Third Quarter

 

 

April

 

 

4/21-4/28

 

April 21 - April 28 Writing 7 Lessons
EALRS: The student will be able to: ACTIVITY
4.1.1 Analyzes and evaluates writing using established criteria.
·       Identifies aspects of the author’s craft (e.g., point of view, purpose, bias).
·       Identifies persuasive elements in a peer’s writing and critiques the effectiveness (e.g., audience appeal, concession and rebuttal, call to action).

4.1.2 Analyzes and evaluates own writing using established criteria.   Explains strengths and weaknesses of own writing using criteria (e.g., WASL  scoring guides).   Rereads own work for the craft of writing (e.g., persuasive techniques, vivid verbs, nifty nouns, elaboration, figurative language) as well as the content (e.g., specific and relevant information).
Uses criteria to choose and defend choices for a writing portfolio.     Provides evidence that goals have been met (e.g., selects piece that shows improved introduction technique, persuasive writing, etc.).


2.4.1 Produces documents used in a career setting.
Produces technical and nontechnical documents for career audiences (e.g., letters, applications, lab reports), taking into consideration technical formats (e.g., fonts, layout, style guides).

2.3.1 Uses a variety of forms/genres.
·       Integrates more than one form/genre in a single piece (e.g., a narrative told using an explanation, a character sketch, a free verse poem, a dialogue, a newspaper article, a document, and a diary entry).
·       Maintains a log or portfolio to track variety of forms/genres used.
·       Produces a variety of new forms/genres.



3.1.1 Analyzes ideas, selects a manageable topic, and elaborates using specific, relevant details and/or examples.
·       Presents a central idea, theme, and manageable thesis while maintaining a consistent focus (e.g., “Commercials influence the spending habits of teenagers.”).
·       Selects specific details relevant to the topic to extend ideas or develop elaboration (e.g., quotations, data, reasons, multiple examples that build on each other).



1.3.1 Revises text, including changing words, sentences, paragraphs, and ideas.
Rereads work several times and has a different focus for each reading (e.g., first reading — changing words to improve clarity; second reading —substituting more effective persuasive language; third reading — adding specific examples to support claim).



3.2.2 Analyzes and selects language appropriate for specific audiences and purposes.
·       Selects and uses specialized vocabulary relevant to a specific content area
Review and practice persuasive writing by analyzing one’s own and other students’ writing using criteria and checklists-- review of intro/conclusions; analyze other student persuasive writing and suggest improvements (are they writing expository or persuasive? what do they need to know?) Review BEARS persuasive techniques;


4/21 Review expository writing; review persuasive intros and conclusions; analyze models: what did they include?  Write final essay
4/22 Run-ons; Review expository writing; review persuasive intros and conclusions; analyze models: what did they include?  Write final essay

4/23 Celebrate WASL relief
4/24 Celebrate WASL relief
4/25  Book Review project; Job Application; intro to project
4/28 Job Application; intro to project; choose activities



2.3.1 Uses a variety of forms/genres.
·       Integrates more than one form/genre in a single piece (e.g., a research paper about a local issue that includes caption with pictures, charts and graphs, and interviews).
·       Maintains a log or portfolio to track variety of forms/genres used.
·       Produces a variety of new forms/genres.
Examples:
- oral histories
- fictional journal entries
- film and drama reviews
- compare/contrast essays
- letters to the editor
- brochures
- web pages
- ballads





3.2.2 Analyzes and selects language appropriate for specific audiences and purposes.
·       Selects and uses specialized vocabulary relevant to a specific content area

 

4/15-4/28

 

April 15 - April 28 Writing 7 Lessons
EALRS: The student will be able to: ACTIVITY
4.1.1 Analyzes and evaluates writing using established criteria.
·       Identifies aspects of the author’s craft (e.g., point of view, purpose, bias).
·       Identifies persuasive elements in a peer’s writing and critiques the effectiveness (e.g., audience appeal, concession and rebuttal, call to action).

4.1.2 Analyzes and evaluates own writing using established criteria.   Explains strengths and weaknesses of own writing using criteria (e.g., WASL  scoring guides).   Rereads own work for the craft of writing (e.g., persuasive techniques, vivid verbs, nifty nouns, elaboration, figurative language) as well as the content (e.g., specific and relevant information).
Uses criteria to choose and defend choices for a writing portfolio.     Provides evidence that goals have been met (e.g., selects piece that shows improved introduction technique, persuasive writing, etc.).


2.4.1 Produces documents used in a career setting.
Produces technical and nontechnical documents for career audiences (e.g., letters, applications, lab reports), taking into consideration technical formats (e.g., fonts, layout, style guides).

2.3.1 Uses a variety of forms/genres.
·       Integrates more than one form/genre in a single piece (e.g., a narrative told using an explanation, a character sketch, a free verse poem, a dialogue, a newspaper article, a document, and a diary entry).
·       Maintains a log or portfolio to track variety of forms/genres used.
·       Produces a variety of new forms/genres.



3.1.1 Analyzes ideas, selects a manageable topic, and elaborates using specific, relevant details and/or examples.
·       Presents a central idea, theme, and manageable thesis while maintaining a consistent focus (e.g., “Commercials influence the spending habits of teenagers.”).
·       Selects specific details relevant to the topic to extend ideas or develop elaboration (e.g., quotations, data, reasons, multiple examples that build on each other).



1.3.1 Revises text, including changing words, sentences, paragraphs, and ideas.
Rereads work several times and has a different focus for each reading (e.g., first reading — changing words to improve clarity; second reading —substituting more effective persuasive language; third reading — adding specific examples to support claim).



3.2.2 Analyzes and selects language appropriate for specific audiences and purposes.
·       Selects and uses specialized vocabulary relevant to a specific content area


4/14 WASL test review, discussion, revision; review persuasive  expectations (clear position; audience/purpose; word choice; concession/rebuttal)

4/15 Review persuasive writing --Continue concession/rebuttal; move to causal chain organization and order of importance

4/16   Review persuasive writing --Continue concession/rebuttal; move to causal chain organization and order of importance; review of intro/conclusions


417  Review persuasive writing-- review of intro/conclusions; analyze other student persuasive writing and suggest improvements (are they writing expository or persuasive? what do they need to know?)

4/18, 4/21, 4/22, 4/23, 4/24 Review and practice persuasive writing by analyzing one’s own and other students’ writing using criteria and checklists-- review of intro/conclusions; analyze other student persuasive writing and suggest improvements (are they writing expository or persuasive? what do they need to know?) Review BEARS persuasive techniques;

If time: Job Application

4/28 Project Work: Introduction; team planning and prewriting

 

4/9-4/14

 

April 9 - April 14 Writing 7 Lessons
EALRS: The student will be able to: ACTIVITY
 3.2.2 Analyzes and selects language appropriate for specific audiences and purposes.
·       Selects and uses precise language to persuade or inform.
·       Selects and uses precise language in poetic and narrative writing.
·       Uses the vernacular appropriately.
·       Selects and uses specialized vocabulary relevant to specific content area (e.g., hypotenuse, quadratic, radius).
·       Uses persuasive techniques (e.g., direct audience appeal, rhetorical questions).
·       Uses literary devices (e.g., simile, metaphor, personification).
·       Uses poetic devices (e.g., repetition, rhythm, rhyme schemes).

4.1.2 Analyzes and evaluates own writing using established criteria.   Explains strengths and weaknesses of own writing using criteria (e.g., WASL  scoring guides).   Rereads own work for the craft of writing (e.g., persuasive techniques, vivid verbs, nifty nouns, elaboration, figurative language) as well as the content (e.g., specific and relevant information).
Uses criteria to choose and defend choices for a writing portfolio.     Provides evidence that goals have been met (e.g., selects piece that shows improved introduction technique, persuasive writing, etc.).

3.2.1 Applies understanding that different audiences and purposes affect writer’s voice.
·       Writes with a clearly defined voice appropriate to audience.
·       Writes in appropriate and consistent voice in narrative, informational, and persuasive writing (e.g., humorous, informal, and knowledgeable voice).

1.3.1 Revises text, including changing words, sentences, paragraphs, and ideas.
Rereads work several times and has a different focus for each reading (e.g., first reading — changing words to improve clarity; second reading —substituting more effective persuasive language; third reading — adding specific examples to support claim).


3.2.2 Analyzes and selects language appropriate for specific audiences and purposes.
 Selects and uses precise language to persuade or inform. Uses persuasive techniques (e.g., direct audience appeal, rhetorical questions).
Uses literary devices (e.g., simile, metaphor, personification).

Conference Preparation


4/7 Inservice

4/8 Career Application:  Eagle Order Form

4/9 WASL test practice/persuasive
Some seventh graders attend schools where their teachers do not accept late homework.  Your principal is thinking of making this a rule at your school.  Take a position on this rule.  Write a multiple-paragraph letter to your principal to persuade him or her to support your position.

4/10 Continue test with scoring guide and checklist for revision--highlight for conference

4/11 Student Parent Teacher Conferences

4/14 WASL test review, discussion, revision

Job Application

 

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