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w70607

Page history last edited by PBworks 13 years, 6 months ago

Syllabus 2006-2007


  1. Syllabus 2006-2007
  2. Fourth Quarter
    1. Continued focus: persuasive writing
    2. Week of May 14
      1. May 18
      2. May 17
      3. May 16
      4. May 15
      5. May 14
    3. Week of May 7
      1. May 11
      2. Root-Digging
      3. May 10
      4. May 9
      5. May 8
      6. May 7
    4. Week of April 30
      1. May 4
      2. Persuasive Speeches
      3. May 3
      4. May 2
      5. May 1
      6. April 30
    5. Week of April 23
      1. April 27
      2. April 26
      3. April 25
      4. April 24
      5. April 23
      6. No Spelling Homework: Rest
    6. Week of April 16
      1. April 20
      2. April 19
      3. April 18
      4. April 17
      5. April 16
      6. Spelling for 4/16
    7. Week of April 9
      1. April 13 Parent Teacher Student Conferences
      2. April 12
      3. April 11
      4. April 10
      5. April 9
  3. Third Quarter
    1. March
      1. Week of 3/26 
      2. Week of 3/19
      3. 3/16
      4. 3/15
      5. 3/14
      6. 3/13 Spelling Words
      7. 3/12 LID Day No students
      8. 3/9
      9. 3/8
      10. 3/7
      11. 3/6
      12. Week of 3/5 With Spelling Words
      13. Spelling Words
      14. Project: Handbook
      15. Grammar: Punctuation
    2. February
      1. Mini-Lessons
    3. Character Sketch 2 & 3
      1. Eagle Poetry
      2.  Poetic language:
      3. Traits of Writing: Ideas and Word Choice--
      4. Details/Description/Specifics
      5. Poetry-- PoetryHints
      6. EALRS
  4. Second Quarter
    1. January Lessons
      1. Mini-lessons
    2. Okanogan History Project
      1. Summary of Project
      2. Traits of Writing: Ideas and Word Choice--
      3. Details/Description/Specifics
      4. Poetry-- PoetryHints
    3. Character Sketch
    4. 12/13 Poetry and Survivor
    5. 12/8 Substitute: Poetry & 12/12 Poetry
    6. 12/11 No school; no water
    7. 12/7 Survivor Project
    8. 12/06 Survivor: Plots and Characters
    9. 12/05 Survivor: Plots and Characters
    10. 12/4 Spelling and Fiction
    11. 12/1 Spelling and Fiction
    12. 11/30 Spelling and Fiction
    13. 11/29 Review and Fiction
    14. 11/28 Sentences, Spelling, Essays
    15. 11/27 Affixes & Sentence Structure
    16. 11/22-26 Thanksgiving
    17. 11/22 Assembly; Homeroom
    18. 11/21 LC Evaluation
    19. 11/20 LC Essay due today
    20. 11/17 Workshop
    21. 11/16 Workshop
    22. 11/15 Conclusion Ideas
    23. 11/14 Poem Samples
    24. 11/13 Past due: two finished paragraphs
    25. 11/09 Introduction, Revision, Poems
    26. 11/08 Vocabulary & Workshop
    27. 11/07 Workshop: LC Essay
    28. 11/06 Penmanship; Criteria
    29. 11/03 Penmanship; Models; Conferences
    30. 11/02 LC Goal paragraph
    31. 11/01 No School
  5. First Quarter
    1. 10/31 Compound Sentences
    2. 10/30 Field Trip
    3. 10/27 Citzenship Projects
    4. 10/26 Citizenship Projects
    5. 10/25 Citizenship Projects
    6. 10/24 Citizenship Projects
    7. 10/23 LC and Citizenship Projects
    8. 10/20 Calico/Invisible paragraphs due
    9. 10/19 Prepositional Phrases
    10. 10/18 Prepositional phrases
    11. 10/17 Compound/complex sentences
    12. 10/16 Prompt & Essay Work
    13. 10/13 Continue Model Analysis
    14. 10/12 Analyze Essay
    15. 10/11 Analysis & Revision
    16. 10/10 Revision
    17. 10/06 Analyze Writing
    18. 10/05 Prep for LC Project
    19. 10/04 Parent-Student-Teacher Conferences
    20. 10/03 WASL Scoring; Conference Prep
    21. 10/02 Procedures and Conference Work
    22. 9/29 Comma Usage (Substitute)
    23. 9/28 Prep for LC Project
    24. 9/27 Prewriting Strategy Review
    25. 9/26 LC Prewriting
    26. 9/25 Teacher Inservice (No School)
    27. 9/22 Native American Day
    28. 9/21 LC Prewriting
    29. 9/20 Descriptions
    30. 9/19 Prewriting Prep for LC Writing
    31. 9/18 WASL pretest (Substitute)
    32. 9/15 Reflect on Team Projects & Leadership
    33. 9/14 Thinking/Problem-solving
    34. 9/13 WASL and Thinking
    35. 9/12 WASL Pretest
    36. 9/11 Prompt and Content Writing
    37. 9/8 Writing Riddle; Cooperative Thinking
    38. 9/7 Pretest, Thinking Skills, Teamwork
    39. 9/6 WASL Writing Pretest
    40. 9/5: Writing Survey/Leadership
    41. 9/1: Scavenger Hunt
    42. 8/31: Share and assess poems
    43. 8/30: Generate idea; Follow a pattern
    44. 8/29: Writing & Thinking, Planners, Set Rules
    45. 8/28 : Barbecue & Welcome


Fourth Quarter

Continued focus: persuasive writing


Week of May 14

 

May 18

Satire, Parody

Garrison Keillor's parody on Casey at the Bat

 

May 17

Persuasive Writing Essays: parent, rule change, pe activity

 

May 16

Persuasive Writing Essays: parent, rule change, pe activity

Definitions: Satire, Parody

 

 

May 15

Sub:

Persuade someone to move to a small town like Nespelem.

May be substituted for rule change or pe essays.

 

May 14

Casey at the Bat:  Humor in writing

Drama: Act it Out!

 

 

 


Week of May 7

 

May 11

Root-Digging

 

May 10

Owhi Lake Day

 

 

May 9

WASL ART Break

 

 

May 8

Quick WASL break: Art lesson

Persuasive Writing Essays

 

 

May 7

Persuasive Writing Essays: parent, rule change, pe activity

 

 


Week of April 30

 

May 4

Persuasive Speeches

 

May 3

Quick WASL break: Art -- 3D

Persuasive Speech prep

 

 

May 2

Persuasive Writing Essays

 

 

May 1

Quick WASL break: Art lesson (stippling)

Review Persuasive Writing: Jeopardy

 

April 30

Persuasive Writing Essays: parent, rule change, pe activity

 

 

 


Week of April 23

April 27

persuasive speech

PE prompt

 

April 26

Act out -- persuasive voice

Final parent persuasive writing -- Revise essays; self-evaluate

 

PE prompt

 

April 25

Final parent persuasive writing --Revise essays; self-evaluate

 

April 24

Review WASL rubric; apply to model samples of PE persuasive prompt; analyze

Requirements for 3 or 4 WASL score:

  • five paragraphs: intro, body, conclusion
  • paragraphs: one topic on topic layered with details, persuasive techniques, enthusiasm (voice), strong verbs
  • paragraphs: concension/rebuttals in polite, strong language with details

April 23

Review persuasive techniques: BEARS         persuasivebears.pdf

 

Writing Application -- persuasive writing   draft/revise-- peer editing of parent letter

No Spelling Homework: Rest

 


Week of April 16

April 20

Writing Application -- persuasive writing   draft/revise-- peer editing

Add persuasive techniques: bandwagon, statistics, quotations, experts, emotive words

 

April 19

Writing Application -- persuasive writing

 

review layering; persuasive model

 

Write first draft with concessions/rebuttals (strong/polite) to parent’s counter arguments

April 18

Persuasive Writing-- review requirements and techniques;

WASL model and rubric;

 

Elaboration Review:

layering vs listing

details, examples

5e’s 5ws

 

HW Due: Get arguments from parents

 

Finish with elaboration the rule change persuasive essay

April 17

Review: WASL rubric; Concession/rebuttal; persuasive techniques; Write Final Rule Change persuasive essay (Homework);

WASL sample  and model essays; PE activity--Model 4 Point Essays

 

April 16

Spelling for 4/16

apiece        behave        behavior    concrete    eager

handkerchief    bandana    neither    either        previous

realize    realization    relieve    relief        succeed

Persuasive writing practice continued (persuasive techniques; Parent Letter; parent persuasion)

HW: Get arguments from parents for something want to or not to do.


Week of April 9

 

April 13 Parent Teacher Student Conferences

April 12

Writing Application -- persuasive writing  -- peer editing

Traits Review

Writing Process Review

Writing Evaluation/Compare

April 11

Persuasive Writing-- review requirements and techniques; draft poem

I used to but now I

April 10

Persuasive Writing-- review requirements and techniques

Writing Strategy Test

April 9

Awards Assembly

Teacher Inservice


 


Third Quarter

March


Week of 3/26 

Spelling Words:

 

appliance    equipment    illustrate    illustrator    liable

guilty        molecule    paradise    heaven        recognize

yesterday    Saturday    Thursday    separate    separately

vehicle

 

Workshop: Introductions and Conclusions for:

Best Teacher

Other essay of choice

 

Introduction: Persuasive Writing Review

WASL requirements (most recent)

Counter arguments

Rhetorical questions; emotive language; experts; statistics

 

Week of 3/19

3/23  Pacific Science Center

 

3/22

Review and practice

15 minutes on Monday to finish:

1) Need introduction and conclusion for "Explain which teacher should receive the Best Teacher Award")

2) Need introduction and conclusion for any of your essays: ASB, Character Sktech, Area Handbook

 

3/21 Conclusions

Review and practice introductions

Review conclusions; model; practice

(Need introduction and conclusion for "Explain which teacher should receive the Best Teacher Award")

 

Conclusion Requirements:

Restate thesis with effect

Tie to beginning

Leave reader with a thought

 

3/20

SB: Comma usage, p. 15

Model and Practice: Introductions

 

Introductions:

Grab Reader (quotation, startling fact, anecdote, question)

Provide Background Information

Thesis: What three points will you explain to your reader?

 

 

3/19

Spelling

ceiling    damage        deceive    deceptive    evidence

evidently    forcible    forcibly    mileage    procedure

violence    violent    wreckage    instant     instance

SB: Comma usage, p. 13

 

Essay Writing

Review of Introductions and Conclusions


3/16

Spelling Tests

Prompt: One sunny and windy March morning, sparkles glittered on our deck as the sun rose.

Use all past lessons: word choice with sensory words, descriptions, figurative language; sequence story

 

3/15

Continue; confer with teacher; revise with checklist

 

3/14

Work on WASL writing prompts: ASB, Character Sketch 3, Classified thank you with revision --

names, details, vivid verbs, figurative language, etc.

 

TB: Word Choice review

 

3/13 Spelling Words

advertise    advertising    advertisement    advertiser    appropriate    

associate    association    associating    controversy    controversial    

satisfy    unsatisfied    Satisfactory    unsatisfactorily    independence machinery    miserable    miserably    particular    particularly

Freewrite

Punctuation -- commas, p. 9

Share "funny guy" revisions

Lunch 11:45

 

 

3/12 LID Day No students

 

 


 

3/9

Freewrite

Spelling test

Punctuation (end) p. 5

Revise and share (funny guy paragraph)

3/8

Free Write

Punctuation Dialogue, SB p. 7

Traitbook: 65 specifice nouns/adjectives

Rewrite and share paragraph (athlete)

 

3/7

Free write

"Writing is hard fun." Donald Graves

It's requires thought.  It's a puzzle.  Our brains love puzzles.

 

11:00 tired, hungry, bored: but it's a puzzle and requires thought.

 

WASL Preparation:

We have learned:

  • Fluency of ideas through free writes
  • Organization of essays and parargraphs, including introductions and conclusions
  • Word choice and voice using figurative language of poets and writers
  • Ideas in threes to include specific details
  •  
  • Now: more revision tricks.
  •  
  • What else?  Word Choice

Include nifty nouns and vivid verbs instead of "What's fun and What stuff?"

Traitbook: 63-65

 


 

3/6

Free Write

Punctuation (edit practice) SB: 3-4

 

WASL like prompt: Handbook

Practice re-reading writing, each time for different focus.

Focus: Names, Action Verbs, Details, Figurative Language, Show with action and dialogue, Cut clutter, Sentence Fluency, Transitions, Clarity (logical)

Model with class.

Work with partner to revise one handbook entry.

 

 


 

Week of 3/5 With Spelling Words

 

Spelling Words

architect    assassin    athlete

captain    champion    director

treasurer    police    burglar

athletic    guard    sheriff

 

Project: Handbook

Collaborate with peers to create a handbook which explains to a person your age who moves into our area.

Prewrite: Generate topics needed by new person; generate three ideas/details for each topic (noun/verb phrases)

Draft: Draft a section from your group

Peer Review: 

    Organization/Order: Is the order appropriate

    Ideas:  What ideas/details could be added?

    Word Choice: Where could literary tools be included?

    Sentence Fluency: Are the sentences all the same? How could they start differently?  How could you shorten some/combine some?

    Voice: Does the writing sound like you care about what the new person needs to know?  Is it interesting?  Do you add humor?

 Revise:  Cut clutter and revise to add the above ideas.

 

Type.  Repeat revision work.

 

Decide as group how to organize for interest.

 

Grammar: Punctuation

Skillsbook 3-45.

 


 

 

 

 

 

February

Mini-Lessons

Ideas:  generate ideas; generate three (3) ideas for each supporting idea (use nouns and verbs in phrases; do not just write topics)

Ideas/Organization:  Use prewrite to organize ideas (number items)

Ideas/Revise: Re-read ideas and add nifty nouns and vivid verbs

Draft: Use prewriting plan and ideas to write draft in paragraphs

Peer Review:  Read to partner; add details, examples, evidence, figurative language (poetic tools)

Revise/Word Choice: add details, examples, evidence, figurative language (poetic tools); cut clutter--any extra/off task or repeated ideas

Revise/Word Choice: don't try to show off vocabulary -- just be specifice and active; create a mind movie

Organization/Transitions

Organization: introductions (question/quote; thesis), conclusions (thesis; question/quote; leave reader with thought)

Edit: correct grammar, punctuation, spelling, paragraphing, capitalization

Publish: Create a final, perfect copy

 

Grammar: Parts of Speech (nouns, verbs, pronouns, adjectives, adverbs)

 

 

Character Sketch 2 & 3

2: Dan

3: Classmate

 

Use hyperbole; create a humorous "Guess Who"

 

Unlike a biographical sketch, which focuses on significant events in a person's life, a character sketch concentrates on revealing personality and character. In other words, it creates a vivid impression of a subject rather than recounting a life story. Use techniques of description, narration, and exposition to let us understand your person.

 

Checklist:

 

  • Introduction: (Story or quote, description, transition, thesis)

Start with a story or quote from your person.  Describe what they look like.  Transition to a thesis statement on the two character traits, such as, “Even though my grandpa is old and walks with a cane, he is fun-loving and honest.”

 

  • Paragraph 1: (TS, Detail and elaboration sentences (6), CS)

Topic Sentence of first trait

Detail sentences to explain with SPECIFIC examples of what the person says and does to prove the trait.

Concluding sentence

 

  • Paragraph 2: (TS, Detail and elaboration sentences (6), CS)

Transition

Topic Sentence of first trait

Detail sentences to explain with SPECIFIC examples of what the person says and does to prove the trait.

Concluding sentence

 

 

  • Conclusion: (Quote, thesis, thought)

A final quote or action about the person

Restate trait thesis statement

Leave reader with a thought (ask a question)

 

 

Revise for Word Choice:

  • Nifty nouns
  • Vivid verbs
  • Simile
  • Alliteration
  • Assonance
  • Senses
  • Onomatopoeia
  • Personification
  • Hyperbole

 

Eagle Poetry

 

 Poetic language:

3.2.2 Analyzes and selects language appropriate for specific audiences and purposes. Application

 Selects and uses precise language in poetic and narrative writing.

Selects and uses literary devices (e.g., metaphor, symbols, analogies).

·       Selects and uses sound devices in prose and poetry (e.g., two-syllable rhyme, repetition, rhythm, rhyme schemes).

 

Traits of Writing: Ideas and Word Choice--

Details/Description/Specifics

Poetry-- PoetryHints

Literary Tools/Poetic Tools/Poetry Tricks

1.2.1 Analyzes task and composes multiple drafts when appropriate.

1.3.1 Revises text, including changing words, sentences, paragraphs, and ideas.

Selects and uses precise language to persuade or inform.

Selects and uses precise language in poetic and narrative writing.

Selects and uses literary devices (e.g., metaphor, symbols, analogies).

Selects and uses sound devices in prose and poetry (e.g., two-syllable rhyme, repetition, rhythm, rhyme schemes).

 

TEST

Gather your poem drafts and final draft.  Where did you revise your poem to include the Literary Tools?

Complete the table to show your skills:

My original idea My revised words Literary Tool Used
The eagle flew in the sky The eagle circled in the silver sky. vivid verb and alliteration
     

 

Tricks of Poets

Alliteration --Repeated beginning consonant sounds, such as "feather fingers flapping"

Assonance --Repeated vowel sounds, such as flies across the skies

Repeated words --Repeat words for effect, like "hops, munches, hops, munches" to show the rabbit doesn't know the danger

Vivid verbs --Action words like flies, spread, searching, hops, munches, drops, fold, dives, scoop, flaps, flows

Nifty nouns --Specific nouns (persons, places, things, ideas); instead of dog, say German Shepard; instead of fast, say 100 miles an hour; instead animal, say rabbit or snake

Personification --Giving life to something not living; such as saying the feathers are fingers

Onomatopoeia    --(ah no mah toe pee ah) Words that sound like the sound they make, such as Bam! Pop! Bang! slap gurgle Phzzzzt

Simile --Comparing two things that are different and finding a similarity -- write it using like or as , such as comparing how high the eagle flies to how a skyscraper is. The eagle flies as high as a skyscraper.

 

EALRS

1 Uses writing process; 2 Writes for different purposes 3 Writes clearly and effectively 4 self assesses with feedback

1.1.1 Analyzes and selects effective strategies for generating ideas and planning writing.   Generates ideas prior to organizing them and adjusts prewriting strategies accordingly.  Gathers information (e.g., takes notes) from a variety of sources 

1.2.1 Analyzes task and composes multiple drafts when appropriate.

1.3.1 Revises text, including changing words, sentences, paragraphs, and ideas.   .

3.2.2 Analyzes and selects language appropriate for specific audiences and purposes. Application

Component 4.1: Analyzes and evaluates others’ and own writing. W

2.4.1 Produces documents used in a career setting.

·       Collaborates with peers on long-term team writing projects

.2.1 Demonstrates understanding of different purposes for writing.

·       Writes to pursue a personal interest, to explain, to persuade, to inform, and to entertain for a specified audience ·       Writes for self expression.

·       Includes more than one mode within a piece to address purpose (e.g., narrative anecdote as an introduction to a persuasive piece of writing).

 


Second Quarter

January Lessons

 

Mini-lessons

 January lessons involved specific lessons in how to interview, how to write a character sketch, how to include description, how to include literary tools, including hyperbole.

Students prewrite, draft, revise, peer review, draft, revise, edit, and publish.

 

Okanogan History Project

 

Summary of Project

Each student has been asked to:

  • Interview a community elder (age 60+) who’s been a long-time Okanogan resident (40+ years)
  • Conduct the interview to find out about historical agricultural practices in the Okanogan, focusing on one type of working lands (i.e. orchards/farms, ranches, or family/working forests)
  • Share the elder’s story and experience through an essay (2-3 pages double-spaced or the handwritten equivalent)

 

Traits of Writing: Ideas and Word Choice--

Details/Description/Specifics

Poetry-- PoetryHints

Literary Tools/Poetic Tools/Poetry Tricks

1.2.1 Analyzes task and composes multiple drafts when appropriate.

1.3.1 Revises text, including changing words, sentences, paragraphs, and ideas.

Selects and uses precise language to persuade or inform.

Selects and uses precise language in poetic and narrative writing.

Selects and uses literary devices (e.g., metaphor, symbols, analogies).

Selects and uses sound devices in prose and poetry (e.g., two-syllable rhyme, repetition, rhythm, rhyme schemes).

 

TEST

Gather your poem drafts and final draft.  Where did you revise your poem to include the Literary Tools?

Complete the table to show your skills:

My original idea My revised words Literary Tool Used
The eagle flew in the sky The eagle circled in the silver sky. vivid verb and alliteration
     

 

Tricks of Poets

__Alliteration__ Repeated beginning consonant sounds, such as "feather fingers flapping"

Assonance Repeated vowel sounds, such as flies across the skies

__Repeated words__ Repeat words for effect, like "hops, munches, hops, munches" to show the rabbit doesn't know the danger

__Vivid verbs__ Action words like flies, spread, searching, hops, munches, drops, fold, dives, scoop, flaps, flows

__Nifty nouns__ Specific nouns (persons, places, things, ideas); instead of dog, say German Shepard; instead of fast, say 100 miles an hour; instead animal, say rabbit or snake

__Personification__ Giving life to something not living; such as saying the feathers are fingers

Onomatopoeia    (ah no mah toe pee ah) Words that sound like the sound they make, such as Bam! Pop! Bang! slap gurgle Phzzzzt

__Simile__ Comparing two things that are different and finding a similarity -- write it using like or as , such as comparing how high the eagle flies to how a skyscraper is. The eagle flies as high as a skyscraper .

 

Character Sketch

 

Unlike a biographical sketch, which focuses on significant events in a person's life, a character sketch concentrates on revealing personality and character. In other words, it creates a vivid impression of a subject rather than recounting a life story. Use techniques of description, narration, and exposition to let us understand your person.

 

Checklist:

 

  • Introduction: (Story or quote, description, transition, thesis)

Start with a story or quote from your person.  Describe what they look like.  Transition to a thesis statement on the two character traits, such as, “Even though my grandpa is old and walks with a cane, he is fun-loving and honest.”

 

  • Paragraph 1: (TS, Detail and elaboration sentences (6), CS)

Topic Sentence of first trait

Detail sentences to explain with SPECIFIC examples of what the person says and does to prove the trait.

Concluding sentence

 

  • Paragraph 2: (TS, Detail and elaboration sentences (6), CS)

Transition

Topic Sentence of first trait

Detail sentences to explain with SPECIFIC examples of what the person says and does to prove the trait.

Concluding sentence

 

 

  • Conclusion: (Quote, thesis, thought)

A final quote or action about the person

Restate trait thesis statement

Leave reader with a thought (ask a question)

 

 

Revise for Word Choice:

  • Nifty nouns
  • Vivid verbs
  • Simile
  • Alliteration
  • Assonance
  • Senses
  • Onomatopoeia
  • Personification

 

 

12/13 Poetry and Survivor

  • Review EALR requirements

Focus: Poetry and Survivor Stories

 

 

What can you do?

1.1.1 Prewriting:

___ Analyzes and selects effective strategies for generating ideas and planning writing.

___ Generates ideas prior to organizing them and adjusts prewriting strategies accordingly.

___ Gathers information (e.g., takes notes) from a variety of sources

1.2.1 Drafts:

___ Analyzes task and composes multiple drafts when appropriate.

1.3.1 Revises text, including changing words, sentences, paragraphs, and ideas. 3.2.2 ·

Survivor and Poetry

___ Changes or add words: description

___ Changes or add words: vivid verbs

___ Changes or add words: nifty nouns

___ Changes or add words: simile

___ Changes or add words: alliteration

_ Changes or add words: assonance

_ Change/add words: setting --where, when, culture (live/think/believe)

___ Changes or add words: characters (dialogue, actions)

3.2.2 Analyzes and selects language appropriate for specific audiences and purposes.

Selects and uses precise language in poetic and narrative writing.

See 1.3.1 for narrative survivor writing and:

___ Selects and uses literary devices (e.g., metaphor, symbols, analogies).

___ Plans and Organizes plot (exposition, rising action, climax, denoument)

___ Plans theme in story

___ Onomatopoeia (words that sound the sound; sound what they mean; splat)

___ Heart and Feeling

___ Senses (sights, sounds, smells, tastes, touch)

___ Repeated consonants

___ Repeated vowels

See 1.3.1 and for poetry: (See pages 194-5 Write Source 2000)

Selects and uses sound devices in prose and poetry

___ Repeated words

___ Repeated consonants

___ Repeated vowels

___ Rhyme words

___ Onomatopoeia (words that sound the sound; sound what they mean; splat)

___ Heart and Feeling

___ Senses (sights, sounds, smells, tastes, touch)

___ Line breaks and forms

___ Component 4.1: Analyzes and evaluates others’ and own writing. Uses this checklist.

 

  • Work on Poetry, Survivor Plot, LC

12/8 Substitute: Poetry & 12/12 Poetry

12/11 No school; no water

  • 12/8 Spelling Test
    • Poetry Definition pages 194-5.
    • Sample List and Title-down poems (page 207).

 

 

Title-down poem

Cough

Outside shivering

Leaves crrruuuunch

Dead under the snow.

List poem

Cold is the tingle in the tips of your fingers.

Cold is the sniffle in your reddened nose.

Cold is the should of your friend turning away.

Cold is the snow, fallen softly: the world froze.

 

 

    • Brainstorm, prewrite, draft, revise a list or title-down snowflake poem (or poem on Holiday Happenings).

 

  • 12/12 Spelling Words
    • Poetry, Continued
    • Review poem expectations: senses, heart, sounds, form.
    • Read Phrase poetry (page 207)
    • Analyze sample phrase poem:

 

Oh Christmas Tree

 

Oh Christmas Tree

A sprightly spruce

Topped with yellow angel

Shining brightly

Purple garland

Wraps ‘round and

‘round and

‘round

the -----

Ouch! Fingers pull

Back from beautiful braided

cloth candy cane------

sticky spruce;

 

Lights flash

Flash

Flash

 

Flash

Mesmerizing eyes of toddlers

Reaching up, eyes twinkling,

Fingers touching,

Faces reflecting

In the delicate mirror ornament.

Ppplinnnng!

Purple

Pieces

Shat t t t t t ter

 

Moms scatter

to

Wipe the tears

and

Whisk the glitter

Fallen on the wooden floor.

 

 

Presents pretty

Placed just so

Children guess

Amid the laughter of adults

Teasing, pleasing

The wishes in their minds

And the angel

Smiles over all

Tall atop the

Christmas Tree.

 

 

    • Brainstorm, prewrite, draft, revise a phrase poem on Holiday Happenings for the Christmas program. Neat sheet with drawing to be turned in.

 


12/7 Survivor Project

 

  • Survivor! Project Plot Profiles and Character analyses discussion.

 

 

    • Establish setting descriptions/pictures.

 

    • Review story elements from yesterday.:
      • __Grade 8__ :
        • Dialogue between people in story
        • Vivid verbs and nifty nouns
        • Show the yelling.
        • Details
      • __Grade 7__ :
        • Title: grabber with alliteration
        • Dialogue between people in story
        • vivid verbs (grab, shatter)
        • nifty noun (poker)
        • assonance: muffled snuffling
        • Expand the moment: zoom-in --- Snapshot "Hank closed the door and leaned back, his heart pounding. "When he'd caught his breath, he turned back to the window. His heart sank. There was the wolf, sitting right where it had sat before." Instead of he closed the door and looked back at the wolf.

 

 

Discuss:

    • What can we learn about writing fiction from these story plots?
    • Review character analysis of the stories.
    • What do you know about the characters? What kind of people were they?
    • What can we learn about writing fiction from these story characters?

 

  • Verbs in Nightmare and Wolf stories:

 

Verbs

Verb Test:

Let us _____________________.

Yesterday, I _______________.

Underline the vivid verbs in the stories. Discuss.

What can we learn about writing fiction from these story verbs?

 

    • Start a plot outline or two of your own story.

 

  • Groups work on LC final drafts on computers.
  • Teacher conferences with individuals.

12/06 Survivor: Plots and Characters

  • Remember: Your last week spelling test (corrected at bottom) and all last week's work is due today.

 

  • Survivor! Project Plot Profiles and Character analyses DUE TODAY.
    • Work on plot profiles and character analysis from Wolf and Nightmare stories.

today and Thursday we will discuss:

    • What can we learn about writing fiction from these story plots?
    • Review character analysis of the stories.
    • What do you know about the characters? What kind of people were they?
    • What can we learn about writing fiction from these story characters?

 

  • Verbs in Nightmare and Wolf stories:

 

Verbs

Verb Test:

Let us _____________________.

Yesterday, I _______________.

Underline the vivid verbs in the stories. Discuss.

What can we learn about writing fiction from these story verbs?

 

  • Groups work on LC final drafts on computers.
  • Teacher conferences with individuals.

12/05 Survivor: Plots and Characters

  • Remember: Your last week spelling test (corrected at bottom) and all last week's work is due Wednesday.

 

  • Survivor! Project
    • Work on plot profiles and character analysis from Wolf and Nightmare stories.

Tomorrow and Thursday we will discuss:

    • What can we learn about writing fiction from these story plots?
    • Review character analysis of the stories.
    • What do you know about the characters? What kind of people were they?
    • What can we learn about writing fiction from these story characters?

 

  • Verbs in Nightmare and Wolf stories:

 

Verbs

Verb Test:

Let us _____________________.

Yesterday, I _______________.

Underline the vivid verbs in the stories. Discuss.

** What can we learn about writing fiction from these story verbs?

 

  • Group times for computer work to revise LC essays.
  • Conferences with teacher for individual needs.

12/4 Spelling and Fiction

  • Spelling Words: More Monday

Write each word six times tonight. Write each word three times on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday. Follow directions for Terrible Tuesday, Wordy Wednesday, and Thoughtful Thursday (see last week's lessons below).

 

 

answer, answered, unanswered, buckle, buckling, unbuckled, cover,covering, uncovered, coverage, dining, nine, ninety, forty, forty-eight, duplicate, duplication reduplicated duplication, embarrass,embarrassing

 

    • Check last week's work
  • Affixes handout: prefix, suffix

 

  • Survivor! Project:Plots and Characters
  • Finish plot profile and character analysis for Nightmare story by Tuesday at the end of class.
  • Finish plot profile and character analysis for Wolf story by Wednesday at the end of class.

 

  • Conferences with teacher this week on your essays: Leadership Essays
    • Learn what to do to improve your grade.
    • Follow individual instructions and turn in.

 


12/1 Spelling and Fiction

  • Spelling tests
  • Read Nightmare at Navajo Lake
    • Complete plot profile
    • Complete character analysis
  • Skillbook pages 3-4.

 

11/30 Spelling and Fiction

 

 

* Skillbook pages 71-74; 75-78: Subject/Predicate; clauses/phrases

* Prompt: Write a nomination speech explaining why a person you know deserves an “Appreciation Award.”

 

    • Project:
      • Survivor: What is a survivor?

 

      • Text: Wolf

 

    • Plot Profile:
      • Read the story. Mark the important events--find the ten most important events.
      • Write the ten important events in order.
      • For each event, mark the graph excitement level--was that event ordinary (1) or suspenseful (10) or somewhere in between. Make a dot above the number of the event on the graph. Connect the dots.

 

    • Character Analysis
  • Who are the characters?
  • What do they look like (physical characteristics)?
  • What are the personalities like? (see adjective list)
  • Analyze the two main characters using the CA chart.
  • Write the name of the character. Tell from the text, what the character says and/or does to show one of the traits. Write an adjective trait in the last column.

 

      • Literary Elements: Expositon, Setting, Characters, Plot, Climax, Resolution, Theme
      • Author's Craft: organization and word choice

 

 

Thoughtful Thursday

Word Origins

Today, learn the origins of five different words from your spelling list. You will need a dictionary. If you don’t have a dictionary at home, go to study hall in the morning.

Directions:

1. Choose five different words. (The base words are different.)

2. Write one of those words.

3. Write its base word.

4. Look up the base word in the dictionary.

5. Find its word origin (English, French, Latin, Greek, etc.)

6-8. Write the language origin, the origin words, and their definitions.

9. Repeat 2-8 for each of your five words.

Example:

1. First word chosen: “theory”

2. Write one of the words: theory

3. Write its base word: theorem

4. Look up the base word in the dictionary.

5. Find its word origin: Greek

6-8 Write the language origin, the origin words, their definitions:

6 Greek 7 theoria 8 to look at (I had to look up the base word theorum to find the meaning).

Are you ready for Friday’s test?

 

 

11/29 Review and Fiction

 

 

* Skillbook pages 71-74: Subject/Predicate

* Prompt: Write a nomination speech explaining why a person you know deserves an “Appreciation Award.”

 

    • Project:
      • Survivor: What is a survivor?

 

      • Text: Wolf

 

    • Plot Profile:
      • Read the story. Mark the important events--find the ten most important events.
      • Write the ten important events in order.
      • For each event, mark the graph excitement level--was that event ordinary (1) or suspenseful (10) or somewhere in between. Make a dot above the number of the event on the graph. Connect the dots.

 

      • Literary Elements: Expositon, Setting, Characters, Plot, Climax, Resolution, Theme
      • Author's Craft: organization and word choice

 

 

 

* Spelling

Wordy Wednesday

Practice getting to know your words.

1. Say each of your spelling words in parts. These do NOT need to be correct syllables.

Examples:

Exercise ex er cise

Certain cer tain

Forcible forc I ble

Efficient e ffi cient

2. For each of twelve of your hardest words, do the following:

a. Write the word.

b. Say the word and count the word parts

c. Draw a line for each word part

d. Say the word again, and write each part as you say it.

e. Say the word again, writing it as one word as you say the parts.

f. Example:

a. Exercise

b. “ex” “er” “cise” 3

c. ex/er/cise

d. “exercise” ex er cise

e. “exercise” exercise

 


 

11/28 Sentences, Spelling, Essays

 

    • Project:
      • Survivor: What is a survivor?

 

    • Turn in LC Essays

 

    • Skillbook 70-71 --sentence structures

 

    • Prompt: Write a nomination speech explaining why a person you know deserves an “Appreciation Award.” (Not discussed yet)

 

 

    • Spelling: Terrible Tuesdays

 

      • Mistaken Spelling Fun

Good spellers can write words different ways to find the right way. This fun practice helps you learn the many different ways “sounds” are spelled in English while helping you learn the correct pattern for each of your words.

 

      • Directions:

Choose five different words (the base words are different) from your spelling list. Write each word correctly twice. Then write each word in as many different ways as it could be spelled phonetically, but isn’t. Box in the correct words. This exercise helps you learn all the possible spellings so you can learn to pick the correct one. Use a dictionary, if necessary.

 

      • Examples:

 

 

Exercise exercise

    • exorsise exorsize exersighze

 

 

Certain certain

    • sertin sertun surtin scurtin

 

 

Forcible forcible

    • forsible forsable phorsable phorscabel ghorscible

 

 

Efficient efficient

    • ephishant uphishant eghitiant ephiciant

 

 

Leaf leaf

    • leef leiphe lleaphe lief leif

 

11/27 Affixes & Sentence Structure

 

 

Affixes

Write Source 328-331

Spelling c/g ly ed s

ceiling

damage damages damaged

deceive deceived

evidence evident evidently

forcible forcibly

instance instances

mileage

procedure procedures procedurally

violence violently

wreckage

__Sentence structure__

Composing Write Source 85-92; 434-438

Today's focus: 434-5;

Skillbook: 69-70

All sentences must have a subject and a predicate (verb).

Can dogs fly?

Who or what? dogs = subject

What do dogs do? fly? = verb (predicate)

 

 

 


11/22-26 Thanksgiving

 


11/22 Assembly; Homeroom

11/21 LC Evaluation

  • Finish final draft.
  • Organize your prewriting and drafts from earliest to most recent, which should be on top.
  • Use the checklist under 's' to self-evaluate your essay.
  • Trade papers; under 'p' evaluate a peer's paper.
  • What do you need to add/change/delete/improve?
  • If you believe you are ready to turn in, rate your own essay on the rubric; ask a peer to rate your essay.
  • If your work is turned in today, you may revise for a better grade when you receive your final grade.

11/20 LC Essay due today

  • Confer with teacher
  • Revise your final draft.
    • Look at your checklist.
    • Did you include everything?
    • Can you add more detail, strong verbs, nifty nouns?
    • How is your sentence fluency?
    • Did you write like you cared?
    • Did you include figurative language?

 

 

  • Edit your essay.
  • Finish your essay (type or handwritten)

 


11/17 Workshop

  • Work on LC essays

 

 

Note: We will be revising and finalizing this essay on Friday and Monday. Essays are due Monday at the end of class. Only assignments turned in on due dates can be revised for a better grade. If you are behind, work at home.

 

  • Confer with teacher

11/16 Workshop

 

  • Choice Time Friday for students who consistently work towards our school goals:

 

 

Try your hardest and do your best.

Stay focused and think carefully.

Complete and turn in work on time.

Ask questions when needed.

Help others and yourself to learn.

Listen.

Participate appropriately (independently, partners, teams).

Work on task.

Manage yourself.

Keep your work, folders, materials organized.

Prepare for classes with supplies, completed assignments.

Use your planner.

Respect all persons, spaces, feelings, property.

Be courteous to all.

Follow directions and corrections without comment.

Treat others with kindness and respect.

Be courteous to all.

Encourage others.

Include all in groups.

Take care of property.

Organize your own areas and work.

Put litter in its place.

Handle equipment safely and carefully.

Leave others' property alone.

 

  • Work on LC Essay
  • Teacher confers with students
  • Spelling Test (20 words)

 

 


11/15 Conclusion Ideas

  • Conclusion sample and ideas
  • Scheduled work today: revised drafts of goal and event paragraph, introduction, and poem; start of conclusion

 

 

Note: We will be revising and finalizing this essay on Thursday and Friday. Only assignments turned in on due dates can be revised for a better grade. If you are behind, work at home.

 

  • Confer with students for guidance.

11/14 Poem Samples

 

 

Val

Speaks in soft tones

In the lazy afternoon with sunlight streaming in

To the dining hall, as steaks simmer.

She encourages us to follow our dreams and our native traditions.

Eldin

Stands proud and strong

In the early morning of grey clouds

After the breakfast in the meal site.

He shares to never give up, even what life is tough, like boot camp.

Gary

Thin, soft-spoken, shares his thrill as Olympic torch runner

In the crazy afternoon of ping! Ping! Pouring rain

Under the wooden-beamed roof of the mess hall.

He says, “Keep going. Never give up.”

 

  • Conferences with students to guide writing.
  • Note: Thank you to the students who focus on task. You know who you are; you will go far in life.

 


11/13 Past due: two finished paragraphs

  • Due today: revised drafts of goal and event paragraphs; introduction or poem
  • Teacher model of revision and introduction for review of expectations:

 

 

Revision:

REVISE:

Where can you add details?

Where can you cut clutter -- duplicated information?

Where can you change words to strong verbs, precise nouns, alliteration, assonance?

Can you combine sentences? Shorten sentences? Rearrange sentence structure to start sentences differently?

Introduction:

Title : What slogan or words have you mentioned in your paragraphs would make a good title?

Grabber Beginning : What detail, question, or quote from LC can you include to grab your reader's attention?

Background Information : Your reader needs to know what Leadership Camp is. Explain in a summary statement(s) what Leadership Camp is.

Slogan : Do you want to include a slogan here? Or wait until the end?

Thesis Statement : What is your goal from Leadership Camp?

 

  • Teacher conferences with students about writing
  • Reminder: Make-up work due tomorrow at 9:15 am. This is an extension from the 11/2 due date.

11/09 Introduction, Revision, Poems

  • Be sure you have 20 starred words for spelling tests next week.
  • Due today: two finished drafts: 1) goal paragraph; 2) event paragraph
  • Suggestions for revising your drafts:

 

 

REVISE:

Where can you add details?

Where can you cut clutter -- duplicated information?

Where can you change words to strong verbs, precise nouns, alliteration, assonance?

Can you combine sentences? Shorten sentences? Rearrange sentence structure to start sentences differently?

 

  • Suggestions for introductions :

 

 

Title : What slogan or words have you mentioned in your paragraphs would make a good title?

Grabber Beginning : What detail, question, or quote from LC can you include to grab your reader's attention?

Background Information : Your reader needs to know what Leadership Camp is. Explain in a summary statement(s) what Leadership Camp is.

Slogan : Do you want to include a slogan here? Or wait until the end?

Thesis Statement : What is your goal from Leadership Camp?

 

  • Suggestions for Poem :

 

 

Read sample poems from students in class.

Use your Write Source 2000 for poem ideas.

Go to: 5W, Echoic, Window Poems for directions and samples.

Poem Ideas: Snap a picture of a scene from LC that relates to your essay. Use that picture to describe the imagery (senses) of that scene.

 

 

  • Peer Sharing
  • Confer with teacher for guidance.

11/08 Vocabulary & Workshop

  • Prepare 5 words for spelling tomorrow
  • Vocabulary:

 

 

Proofread : to correct errors in writing; correct spelling, capitalization, punctuation, grammar, paragraphing, legibility; in school, we call this editing for conventions of writing.

Revise : to rewrite for clarity and details; make the writing flow from idea to idea through organizational and sentence fluency changes. Add more details to create images in the reader's mind. Cut extra, non-important information; cut clutter. Change words for clarity and details. In journalism, this is called editting. Refer to the progression of essays about the veterinarian.

 

  • Workshop time; confer with teacher

11/07 Workshop: LC Essay

  • Finish paragraphs 1 & 2 of LC Essay LCcamp
  • Note: Basketball players left at 10:45 a.m.

 


 

11/06 Penmanship; Criteria

  • Practice cursive
  • Criteria for LC Essay
    • Criteria for Ideas
    • Criteria for Organization
    • Criteria for Style: word choice, sentence fluency, voice
    • Criteria for Conventions
    • Links to Sample Rubric:
  • Time for writing paragraphs 1,2
  • Confer with teacher for suggestions

11/03 Penmanship; Models; Conferences

  • Cursive Writing: Copy poem in cursive
  • Time to work on Paragraph 1 of LC essay; teacher confers with students
  • Mini-lesson: Model for paragraph 2

 

 

Paragraph 2—event/activity that helped you choose your goal—imagery /slogan/ explanation event/activity that helped you choose your goal

Transition As a result

Topic Sentence Jane Snow convinced me to stay away from drugs.

Concrete Detail Jane Snow spoke about the harmful effects of drugs and the positive effects of healthy choices. She was tall with long brown hair and brown eyes. The sun shone on her face.

Commentary First, she explained how drugs affect your body and your family,

Commentary For example, some drugs make you hyper so you cannot attend to basic needs like eating and exercise. You can’t even learn because you can’t focus. Also, your family begins to gripe at you, and you start griping back.

Concrete Detail Next, Jane stressed the healthy choices.

Commentary Exercise is important to stay fit. It’s also a great hobby.

Commentary Healthy foods keep you well.

Clincher Healthy Body; Healthy Mind

Write Paragraph : As a result of the presentation by Jane Snow, I am convinced to stay away from drugs. Jane Snow spoke about the harmful effects of drugs and the positive effects of healthy choices. She stood up straight and tall. She gestured with her hands to emphasize important points, and her long brown hair waved with her passionate words. Her dark brown eyes connected with all of us. Her face shone brightly in the afternoon light, and her words sparkled with hope. We sat still, glued to her ideas like honey to bread as we learned the sweet truth about positive living. First, she explained how drugs affect your body and your family. For example, some drugs make you hyper so you cannot attend to basic needs like eating and exercise. You can’t even learn because you can’t focus. Also, your family begins to gripe at you, and you start griping back. It’s a vicious cycle where everyone is hurt. Next, Jane stressed the healthy choices. Exercise is important to stay fit. It’s also a great hobby. Hobbies keep you active. Physical health builds energy so you have more energy for real fun with your sports and hobbies. Healthy foods keep you well. When drugs fill your life, you loose the fun of friends and sports, and the physical health to stay well. Jane convinced me to choose a healthy lifestyle and better friends. Not only will I have a healthy body, but I will also have a healthy mind. In fact, my motto could be “Healthy Body; Healthy Mind; Healthy Family and Friends.”

 

  • Teacher conferences with students

 


11/02 LC Goal paragraph

  • Spelling Tests
  • Vocabulary
    • concrete : something physical; real
    • abstract : an idea; a thought
    • commentary : an explanation of a situation or event
  • Review of cursive penmanship (due Friday)
  • What goal did you set for yourself after leadership camp?
    • What is your goal?
    • What steps will you take to achieve it?
  • Paragraph Outline:
    • Transition (from introduction):
    • Topic Sentence:
      • Concrete detail (step one to meet goal):
        • Commentary on detail:
        • Commentary on detail:
      • Conrete detail (step two to meet goal):
        • Commentary on detail:
        • Commentary on detail:
  • Model outline and first draft paragraph

 

 

 

Paragraph 1 Ideas for goal (what you hope to achieve) and action steps to meet goal:

Transition How will I use my leadership camp training?

Topic Sentence I will choose to live a drug-free life.

Concrete Detail First, I will learn several hobbies.

Commentary Hobbies will keep my busy. I won’t have time for drugs.

Commentary Some hobbies I can choose include beading, sports, and reading. I can learn to bead gifts for friends or to start a craft business. Sports like basketball and volleyball keep me active and healthy. Reading provides an escape of the imagination.

Concrete Detail Second, I will choose friends who will honor my decision. A good friend appreciates me for who I am and does not push me into popping pills.

Commentary I will accept my friends for who they are, but I will make my own decisions that affect my health and safety.

Clincher Hobbies and good friends create a fence against drug use.

Write Paragraph : How will I use my leadership camp training? I will choose to live a drug-free life. One step to staying drug-free includes learning several hobbies. Hobbies will keep my busy. I won’t have time for drugs. Some hobbies I can choose include beading, sports, and reading. I can learn to bead gifts for friends or to start a craft business. Sports like basketball and volleyball keep me active and healthy. Reading provides an escape of the imagination. Another step towards a drug-free live is to choose friends who will honor my decision. A good friend appreciates me for who I am and does not push me into popping pills. Instead, they will join me in my hobbies. I will probably enjoy many different friends if I expand my life to include many hobbies. In addition, I will accept my friends for who they are, but I will always make my own decisions that affect my health and safety. If tempted, I will remind myself, “Lead yourself and younger kids into the future: Be a role model.” I can also say to my tempters, “I choose to control myself, not let drugs control me.” Then I will walk away. Hobbies and good friends will control my life, not drugs.

 

 

 

  • Time to prewrite and draft goal paragraph
  • Resource: LCcamp directions

 


11/01 No School

  • Teacher inservice

First Quarter

10/31 Compound Sentences


10/30 Field Trip

  • Salmon Field Trip for science class
  • Halloween Party tomorrow at 1:50 pm

10/27 Citzenship Projects

  • Write final drafts
  • Confer with teacher as needed

10/26 Citizenship Projects

  • __Entry Tasks__ :
    • Take your Partner Spelling Tests
    • Work on your Leadership Camp prewriting outline; Use prewriting outline for further prewriting or as plan for draft; add more details in your draft.

 

  • __Class work__ :
  • Citizenship work:
    • Take turns sharing and offering feedback
      • Offer feedback to a partner by listening to your partner's draft and sharing two items with your partner; Switch roles
      • Partners share two items as feedback:
      • 1. One positive part of the writing, such as
        • a. I like this idea (tell the idea)
        • b. I like these powerful and specific words (tell the words)
        • c. I like how you organized it and used these transitions (tell transitions)
        • d. I like these (point to) longer sentences (or shorter, or sentences with different beginnings).
        • e. I like the way you wrote like you cared. For instance, when you wrote ______.
      • 2. One suggestion for improvement, such as
        • a. Have you thought about adding this idea (give a specific idea or detail)
        • b. Have you thought about changing these words to ___________ to add specific words or alliteration.
        • c. Have you thought about a grabber beginning, such as...
        • d. Have you thought about a conclusion, such as...
        • e. Have you thought about a transition here (explain)
        • f. Have you thought about making a short sentence (or longer, or different start) in these places (explain)
        • g. Have you thought about added these interesting words to show you care (explain)

 

  • Revisions: Step by Step: Read your draft several times to organize, add details, combine sentences. Follow the steps below.

 

EALR 1.3.1 Revises text, including changing words, sentences, paragraphs, and ideas. Rereads work several times and has a different focus for each reading (e.g., first reading — looking for variety of sentence structure and length; second reading — checking for clarity and specific word choice; third reading — checking for layers of elaboration and persuasive language).

 

 

        • Think: ADD, CUT, REWRITE to make the writing more clear and detailed.

 

 

1. Reread your prewriting plan and your draft to check that you have stayed on topic for audience and purpose in your draft.

    • Audience: An adult, probably a veteran, who wants to know:
      • Do you know what it means to be a citizen in America?
    • Purpose: to explain what it means to be a citizen in America? How does a citizen act?

 

2. Reread to shorten some sentences and combine others for sentence fluency : start sentences in different ways; use complete sentences, some short and some long.

 

 

3. Reread to make sure the sentences flow from one idea to the next with transitions .

 

4. Reread to add vivid verbs and specific nifty nouns. Delete (cut) unnecessary information. Make your word choice specific and concise.

 

5. Reread to add alliteration and voice -- show you really care about the topic by the specific details you add. Have you included a quote? an anecdote or example? a question?

 

6. Reread for organization : add your introduction (grabber beginning, background knowledge, thesis statement) and conclusion (summary statement, tie to introduction, leave reader with a thought).

 

7. Peer Edit : Edit yourself for punctuation, capitalization, spelling, paragraphing, etc. Ask a peer to check also.

 

8. Write your final draft .

 

  • __Class work and HW__ : draft/revise: be specific; take your work home to finish. Final draft is due tomorrow for contest.

 

  • __Contest permission slips__

10/25 Citizenship Projects

  • Time for prewriting for Leadership Camp Essay
  • Watch, discuss, review -- Video: Citizenship
  • Review audience and purpose
  • Prewriting for essay; Use prewriting as a plan for draft

 

Models for students

 

1.1 gather and organize for essay (prewrite)

audience/purpose 2.1.1/2.2.1

 

Use prewriting for drafts 1.2.1


10/24 Citizenship Projects

  • Spelling words
  • Prewriting to prompts:
    • “Citizenship in America”
    • “I’m Proud to be an American”
    • The EsSay process
  • Prewrite to Writing prompts (see 10/23)
  • Sample prewrites and model essay--How does prewriting connect to drafting?
  • Citizenship Video and discussion

10/23 LC and Citizenship Projects

  • Vocabulary review-- add pictures
  • Follow outline to prewrite for LC assignment. OutLineLC
  • Alternative Assignment for those not attending LC
  • Citizenship Pretest
  • Video: American At Its Best: What does it mean to be a citizen?
  • Prompts for contests and assignments:
    • “Citizenship in America”
    • “I’m Proud to be an American”

 

 

 

 

 

  • Resources:
Web Site Topic URL: Univeral Resource Locator
Ben's (Franklyn) Guide to Citizenship Rights & Responsibilities http://bensguide.gpo.gov/6-8/citizenship/index.html
PBS Kids Citizenship pages http://www.pbs.org/democracy/kids/educators/citizenshipcity.html
PBS Kids Voting Booth http://pbskids.org/democracy/vote/index.html

 


10/20 Calico/Invisible paragraphs due

  • Vocabulary Review
  • Assignment Analysis --Did the essay follow the requirements?
    • Model for student assignment next week
    • Outline and time for writing next week
  • Prepositional Phrases review
    • Time to finish and turn in "invisible" paragraph
  • Invisible paragraph due today with 6 prepositional phrases underlined; 6 prepositons circled:
    • Example:
    • I will stand behind the couch in the livingroom after dinner .
  • Calico Cat revision paragraph due today.
  • Progress Reports

 

Writing EALR 4.1 Component 4.1 Analyzes and evaluates others’ and own writing.
EALR 3.2.3 Uses a variety of sentences.

10/19 Prepositional Phrases

  • Spelling Tests
  • Vocabulary:
Word Description
citizen a person legally a member of a state, country, city, etc.
citizenship behaving like a citizen; the quality of a citizen
democracy government by the people who may elect representatives
republic government by the people who may elect representatives and who elect a president rather than a king

 

  • Prepositional phrases review
  • Calico Cat paragraph revision due tomorrow

10/18 Prepositional phrases

  • Substitute
  • Prompt: If I were invisible, I ...
  • Expand sentences with prepositional phrases
    • The mean dog barked.
    • The mean dog in my neighbor's yard barked
    • The mean dog in my neighbor's yard barked through the fence.
    • The mean dog in my neighbor's yard barked through the fence at my tabby cat.
  • Rewrite prompt paragraph with six prepositonal phrases.

10/17 Compound/complex sentences

  • Spelling words checked
  • Define and practice compound/complex sentences
  • Review paragraph writing from calico cat prompt; share excellent examples; continue as homework due Friday

10/16 Prompt & Essay Work

  • Prewrite/draft/revise/edit: Explain what would happen if a calico cat dipped its paw into a goldfish bowl on the end table.
  • Discuss the revisions of the essay "A Gift from My Uncle"

10/13 Continue Model Analysis

  • Analyze Essay with rubric and a different checklist to further clarify each trait of good writing
  • Read final draft; underline changes
  • Discuss changes in groups--did the author add, rewrite, or cut for each change?

10/12 Analyze Essay

  • Spelling Tests
  • Analyze Essay independently; discuss with team using evidence from the essay to explain your score; mark essay with your evidence of the six traits of good writing (ideas, organization, voice, word choice, sentence fluency, conventions)

 

10/11 Analysis & Revision

 

  • Read to connect reading to writing: “How My Uncle Helped Me”
  • Underline the best parts --those with excellent word choice (nifty nouns and vivid verbs) and details (ideas).
  • Choose two sentences in the essay from the essay "A Job I Like."
  • Revise the each sentence for excellent word choice.
  • Be prepared to share--can you revise as well as the author?
Reading EALR/GLE 2.4.7 Make judgments about how effectively an author has supported his/her belief and/or assumptions, citing text-based evidence.

 

Writing EALR 4.1 Component 4.1: Analyzes and evaluates others’ and own writing.

10/10 Revision

  • Reread the essay "How my Uncle Helped Me"
  • Choose two sentences in the essay from the essay "A Job I Like."
  • Revise the each sentence for excellent word choice.
  • Be prepared to share
  • Choose five spelling words for me to check.

10/06 Analyze Writing

  • Read to connect reading to writing: “How My Uncle Helped Me”
    • Analyze effectiveness of writing with "A Job I Like" using Six Traits of Writing

 

 

Reading EALR/GLE 2.4.7 Make judgments about how effectively an author has supported his/her belief and/or assumptions, citing text-based evidence.

 

Writing EALR 4.1 Component 4.1: Analyzes and evaluates others’ and own writing.

10/05 Prep for LC Project

  • Spelling Test
  • Review writing process.
  • Review Six Traits
    • Handbook 19/20

 

 

Writing GLE: 2.2.1 Demonstrates understanding of different purposes for writing. Writes to analyze informational and literary texts. Writes to learn (e.g., KWL Plus; summary; double-entry notes).

 

 

 

    • Notes: In your notes, include: the trait, its explanation, a symbol that represents it
      • Class Work: The remaining four traits completed
    • Jigsaw: Share your group's knowledge with another group.
    • Pantomime: Create a pantomime on a selected writing trait. (Two minutes)

10/04 Parent-Student-Teacher Conferences

  • Arrive with your guardian, explain class procedures, your work, your WASL pretest, your grades.
  • Guardians write two compliments and one goal for you.
  • Teachers answer any questions

10/03 WASL Scoring; Conference Prep

  • Spelling check
  • Practice Spelling Homework Procedures
  • Prewrite to prompt:
    • Write a letter to your family explaining what is important about writing class. Include at least three important activities.
    • Conference Prep: WASL tests/scores review

10/02 Procedures and Conference Work

  • Spelling: find 30 words for your personal spelling list; choose 5 for Tuesday
  • Procedures: Hallway, Enter Class, Class Work (independent, partner, group), Leave Class
  • Review School and Class Rules
  • Sign Contracts
  • Practice procedures
  • Conference Preparation and practice--Skills /Conference sheet

9/29 Comma Usage (Substitute)

9/28 Prep for LC Project

  • Review writing process.
  • Intro/review Six Traits
    • Handbook 19/20
    • Notes: In your notes, include: the trait, its explanation, a symbol that represents it
      • Class Work: 2 traits completed

9/27 Prewriting Strategy Review

  • In notes on LC, add 4th column: goal--what do you hope to achieve?
  • Review our prewriting strategies used in our LC discussions:
    • Gathering Ideas: Text pages:
      • 54: Gathering Information with freewriting, lists, analyzing (parts, senses, comparisons) 5Ws (who, what, when, where, why)
      • 56 : Graphic Organizers--columns and charts
      • 60: organization patterns--choose and explain to class your LC pattern

9/26 LC Prewriting

  • I learned statements, continued
    • Share, listen, take notes as prewriting to gather information
      • Four columns:
        • Presenter/activity
        • Slogan
        • I learned that...
        • How I will use this (goal) (tomorrow)
  • __Homework__:
    • Note: This was due 9/21
    • Write 3 descriptive paragraphs using sensory imagery and similes to describe three different events at LC

9/25 Teacher Inservice (No School)

9/22 Native American Day

9/21 LC Prewriting

  • I learned statements
    • Share, listen, take notes as prewriting to gather information
    • Share descriptions of LC

9/20 Descriptions

  • Think of one incident at LC
    • Zoom in, like a camera
    • Describe the incident in detail
      • Include senses: sights, sounds, textures, smells, feelings
      • Include similes (comparisons)
      • Use strong verbs and nifty nouns
        • Example: The dark blue water welcomed us with its calm, glassy surface, reflecting the clouds like a mirror. However, Jan dipped her toes into water on silky shore, shivered, and exclaimed, "I'm not e diving into that iceberg!"

 

        • Student samples:
          • Speakers spoke wisely and proudly while kids sat staring at their food, mouth watering.
          • I crept through the cabin frequently, wondering of there were something dangerous outside.
          • I dove like a dolphin learning to swim.
          • Our beds were hard as rocks.
  • __Homework__ due tomorrow:
    • Write 3 descriptive paragraphs using sensory imagery and similes to describe three different events at LC.

9/19 Prewriting Prep for LC Writing

  • Three columns:
    • Presenter/activity
    • Slogan
    • I learned (9/21)
  • Share, listen, take notes as prewriting to gather information for project writing
  • Project Goal: Leadership Camp Goal letters with poem explaining LC.

9/18 WASL pretest (Substitute)


9/15 Reflect on Team Projects & Leadership

  • What did you learn from the Tower and Stretch projects?
  • What events/activities/presenters occured at Leadership Camp?
  • What were your thoughts, feelings, concerns, surprises, etc.?
  • Why did the presenters share what they did? What were you to learn?
  • Be thinking: What do you hope to achieve with your training?
  • Turn in notes.

9/14 Thinking/Problem-solving

  • Name Game
  • Stretch Project

9/13 WASL and Thinking

  • WASL test
  • Thinking Problem: Tower

 

 

9/12 WASL Pretest

 

  • WASL Pretest Writing (Girls)

 

 

9/11 Prompt and Content Writing

 

  • I found a magic ring that...
  • Read and write in content area

 


9/8 Writing Riddle; Cooperative Thinking

 

  • Riddle: Who am I?
  • Use strategies for project: Create a long"stretch" with minimal resources

9/7 Pretest, Thinking Skills, Teamwork

 

  • Work again on writing test
  • Learn brainstorming and thinking strategies (fluency, flexibility, originality, elaboration)
  • Use strategies for project: Build a tower with minimal resources

9/6 WASL Writing Pretest


9/5: Writing Survey/Leadership

 

*Complete a survey on what you know about writing

*Predict and discuss about Leadership Camp

*What will happen?

*What do you plan to achieve?

*Introductions to Beth and Nancy



9/1: Scavenger Hunt

 

*Discover your English textbook by completing Scavenger Hunt # 1


8/31: Share and assess poems

 

  1. Student Poems: "I am": Review and assess partner poems using "Record Sheets for Writing Samples" and criteria established yesterday.
  2. Share with partners and whole class.

8/30: Generate idea; Follow a pattern

 

  1. Poem "I am": Read poem; find patterns and line break suggestions
  2. Poem characteristices: facts, fun, dreams, a worry, a sadness,
  3. Poem pattern: I + verb; Repeating line: I am a _________ boy/girl who loves ______________.
  4. Assignment: Create a poem following the pattern and including the poem characteristics. Bring Neat Sheet to class tomorrow.


8/29: Writing & Thinking, Planners, Set Rules

 

  1. The first day of school: take notes, underline in texts--part of reading process for making a mind movie
  2. Review Barbecue Welcome and Think Different inspiration. "How are you smart?" homework.
  3. Planners: What's in them?
  4. Why are we here?: How will we act to achieve our goals? Create a class contract for our goals and behavior.


8/28 : Barbecue & Welcome

 

  • Think Different, Change the World, Inpire: Each of us can make a difference in the world, either close at home, or on a larger scale, such as taking a trip to Washington, DC to lobby for our schools.
  • How are you smart? Take the survey on multiple intelligences and see where your talents shine. Bring the paper back tomorrow to share.

 

 

 

 

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